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Depression does not always mean
Beautiful girls shattering at the wrists
A glorified, heroic battle for your sanity
Or mothers that never got the chance to say good-bye

Sometimes depression means
Not getting out of bed for three days
Because your feet refuse to believe
That they will not shatter upon impact with the floor

Sometimes depression means
That summoning the willpower
To go downstairs and do the laundry
Is the most impressive thing you accomplish that week

Sometimes depression means
Lying on the floor staring at the ceiling for hours
Because you cannot convince your body
That it is capable of movement

Sometimes depression means
Not being able to write for weeks
Because the only words you have to offer the world
Are trapped and drowning and I swear to God I’m trying

Sometimes depression means
That every single bone in your body aches
But you have to keep going through the motions
Because you are not allowed to call in to work depressed

Sometimes depression means
Ignoring every phone call for an entire month
Because yes, they have the right number
But you’re not the person they’re looking for, not anymore

by “Alexandra” Tilton, NH (Teen Ink: November 2013 Issue)

This is so sad

(via xwhatever-nevermindx)

(Source: stellines)

analligator asked:

what kind, if any, of workouts do you do? your abs and your arms are on point... you have great musculature. // also what kind of paint do you use for the full body painting stuff?

Thanks for the compliment. As you discovered & told me in a later ask, I had actually answered all of these questions in earlier, recent posts. I cannot exercise due to being permanently disabled, but I do have a fitness tag in which I talk about how eating healthy and in moderation can really help. I had just answered the body paint question in great detail in several posts that can be found in the body paint tag.
  
Also, I updated my Frequently Asked Questions/About Me/Please Read Before Sending An Ask (which no one reads so don’t feel bad lol)

yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info
yasboogie:

James C. Lewis “Icons Of The Bible”

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.
"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."
For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.
Zoom Info

yasboogie:

James C. LewisIcons Of The Bible

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."

For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.

#disabilityfest - Karma

marvelwomenofcolor:

Origin: Karma was created by Chris Claremont in 1980 and first appeared in Marvel Team-Up #100. After incident with FF she was taken under Charles Xavier’s care and joined New Mutants team.

But it was long time before Second Coming event, during which Shan was attacked by Cameron Hodge.

image

She was badly injured, and her left leg had to later be amputated. But Madison Jefferies created cybernetic prosthesis for her:

image

I must admit that this prosthesis is quite wierd for Marvel standarts and not so neat looking as some others, and seems to be hard in use. I mean look at this:

image

image

image

Soon after “Second Coming” Karma quits New Mutants, to take care of  Face, with whom she has special connection.

image

And she stays outside the action untill Marjorie Liu makes her one of the lead characters in “Astonishing X-Men”. Liu had shown that Shan dosen’t wear prosthesis all the time and has toolkit to take it off and adjust it by herself:

image

image

Visibility: She was important character in Marjorie Liu’s run on Astonishing X-Men and appeared on few covers, but usually was put in the corner, exept two covers, on one of them, drawn by Dustin Weaver, we can see Shan adjusting her prosthetic leg:image


Disability as the superpower?: No. Her powers are mental in nature and were not affected by physical changes.

Where is she now: Probably she is still Junior Staff Member at the Jean Grey’s school, taking care of Face and her siblings. This character is a great challenge and responsibility for authors because she is disabled lesbian Woman of Color, and I hope that soon there would be someone brave enough to properly use such underrated character.

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Color My Fro: A Natural Hair Coloring Book for Big Hair Lovers of All Ages
31 big-haired fairies, mermaids, warriors, models, cheerleaders, and fierce divas grace the pages of this coloring book celebrating the beauty of black women and natural hair. At each turn of the page, a new natural hair inspired illustration greets you.
The Colorful Adventures of Zoe & Star: An Activity and Coloring Book 
Tired of the lack of diversity in children’s coloring books? Meet Zoe and Star, two adventurous African-American girls who just love to have fun! Follow them throughout over 45 fun-filled coloring and activity pages that inspire creativity, promote self-confidence and celebrate diversity.
Crystal Swain-Bates…
holds a Master’s degree in International Affairs from Florida State University and is an avid world traveler. Crystal is an author and the owner of Goldest Karat Publishing, a boutique publisher of educational non-fiction titles, coloring books, and entertaining children’s books aimed at African-American audiences. Goldest Karat’s goal is to fill the diversity gap in traditional publishing by providing readers with high quality books featuring characters of African descent.
http://crystalswainbates.com/
Zoom Info

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Color My Fro: A Natural Hair Coloring Book for Big Hair Lovers of All Ages

31 big-haired fairies, mermaids, warriors, models, cheerleaders, and fierce divas grace the pages of this coloring book celebrating the beauty of black women and natural hair. At each turn of the page, a new natural hair inspired illustration greets you.

The Colorful Adventures of Zoe & Star: An Activity and Coloring Book

Tired of the lack of diversity in children’s coloring books? Meet Zoe and Star, two adventurous African-American girls who just love to have fun! Follow them throughout over 45 fun-filled coloring and activity pages that inspire creativity, promote self-confidence and celebrate diversity.

Crystal Swain-Bates…

holds a Master’s degree in International Affairs from Florida State University and is an avid world traveler. Crystal is an author and the owner of Goldest Karat Publishing, a boutique publisher of educational non-fiction titles, coloring books, and entertaining children’s books aimed at African-American audiences. Goldest Karat’s goal is to fill the diversity gap in traditional publishing by providing readers with high quality books featuring characters of African descent.

http://crystalswainbates.com/


Back in spring 2008, (I love the Gmail archive) I was talking to one of my best friends, Mia Mingus, about the ways that Black women are depicted in the media. She, a self described ‘queer physically disabled Korean woman transracial and transnational adoptee,’ suggested that there could be a term to describe just that, because she too noticed that the way Black women were treated was different from other women of color. I played around with words and ultimately settled on misogynoir (sistagyny was one I thankfully discarded). I had other Black women, Whitney Peoples, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, among others, vet the term and we talked about its potential utility, its pros and cons. I started to use it on the Crunk Feminist Collective and members of the CFC started to use it too (I put it in my dissertation and journal articles no one will read :)). It took on a life of its own on tumblr and it is amazing that so many folks I don’t know have take up and use it far more frequently than I have. Major thanks to Trudz aka Gradient Lair.

I say all this to say that it is important to me and to at least one other non Black person of color that the term is used to describe the unique ways in which Black women are pathologized in popular culture. What happens to Black women in public space isn’t about them being any woman of color. It is particular and has to do with the ways that anti-Blackness and misogyny combine to malign Black women in our world.

I see some folks are trying out misogynchrom for a term that applies to women of color generally. For me, POC and WOC as terms don’t really get to the heart of what is happening in our connections as non white folks. These are useful terms for building solidarity in some ways but have significant limits. See Janani’s post on BGD for more on the limits. I don’t know that lumping all other WOC into one category is useful, especially when the differences between us could help us root out our own internalized oppressors.

I was looking for precise language to describe why Renisha McBride would be shot in the face, or why the Onion would think it’s okay to talk about Quvenzhané the way they did, or the hypervisibilty of Black women on reality TV, the arrest of Shanesha Taylor, the incarceration of CeCe, Laverne and Lupita being left off the TIME list, the continued legal actions against Marissa Alexander, the twitter dragging of black women with hateful hashtags and supposedly funny instagram images as well as how Black women are talked about in music. All these things bring to mind misogynoir and not general misogyny directed at women of color more broadly. Find the language that works for you but please don’t redefine the terms we create for ourselves.

Moya Bailey

Her essay More On The Origin Of Misogynoir. She coined this term. It is about Black women’s experiences, specifically. This specificity does not harm non-Black women. However, White women or non-Black women of colour deciding to co-opt via de-contextualized generalizations that create erasure does harm Black women. Erasure is violence.

(via ai-yo)

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